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Connecting People and Ideas for Integrated Development

Schedule

  • 8:30-9:00 - Breakfast and Registration
  • 9:00-9:15 - Introductions/Welcome by CID Director
  • Welcome – William B. Hedberg, Senior Vice Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
  • Conference Overview – David E. Guinn, Senior Associate and Project Director, SUNY Center for International Development
  • 9:15-10:30 - Session 1: Trafficking in Persons; An Overview
    • Moderator: Laura V. Gonzalez-Murphy, PhD, NYS Governor’s Taskforce on Trafficking, Director, New York State Office for New Americans, Department of State
    • Overview of USAID Progam — Vy Lam, PhD, Human Rights Fellow, US Agency for International Development, Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance; Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance Center, Human Rights Division
    • Legal Enforcement and Criminal Enterprise — Patrick J. Hannon, Director, Human Smuggling and Trafficking Center
    • Abstract: Human trafficking is a pervasive problem. It rivals, if not dwarfs other well-known problems such as terrorism. Human Trafficking is a global epidemic and it impacts all walks of life, either directly in the form of its victims, or indirectly through its impacts on society. Not only are the victims diverse, the traffickers themselves represent a broad range of criminals. Among the obvious, its high profit and low risk have converted many drug traffickers into human traffickers. When asked why they started trafficking humans instead of drugs, one former drug trafficker stated, "you can only sell drugs once, where as humans can be sold many times over". Other [recent] trafficking criminals include a minister and his wife, the head of a Bible School, a navy sailor, a cheerleader, a firefighter, and a real-estate agent. The Human Smuggling and Trafficking Center (HSTC) is a legislatively designated Center created in 2005 to combat human trafficking. The Center, which is co-administered by the Department of Homeland Security, Department of State, and the Department of Justice, works across the government to enhance collaboration and to develop and deliver intelligence to law enforcement stakeholders and policy-makers alike. My talk will discuss the above, compare human trafficking and terrorism, as well as delve into trends, patterns, vulnerabilities, areas where the non- government community can provide assistance.

  • 10:45-11:00 - Coffee Break
  • 11:00-12:30 - Session 2: Violent Extremism and Countering Violent Extremism
    • Moderator: Camila Campisi, Empire State Fellow, New York State Office for New Americans, NYS Governor’s Taskforce on Trafficking
    • Nature of USAID CVE Programming – Vy Lam, PhD, Human Rights Fellow, USAID/DCHA/DRG, Human Rights Division
    • Confronting Trafficking and Violent Extremism in Construction and Procurement by the US State Department – Vincent J. Abramo, Construction Safety & Occupational Health Manager, Overseas Buildings Operations U.S. Department of State
  • 12:30-1:30 - Lunch
  • 1:30-3:30 - Session 3: Researching Trafficking and Violent Extremism
    • Moderator: Rey Koslowski, PhD, Master of International Affairs Program Director and Professor in the Department of Political Science in Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy
    • Researching Trafficking and Violent Extremism:
    • University at Albany - Niloufer Saddiqui, Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy
    • Crime, Conflict and the Legitimacy Trade-off
    • University at Albany – Victor Asal, PhD, Chair of the Department of Public Administration and Professor in the Department of Political Science at Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy; and R. Karl Rethemeyer, PhD, Interim Dean Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy and Professor in the Public Administration and Policy Department
    • Femicide Rates and their Relation to TIP
    • University at Albany – Matthew C. Ingraham, JD, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy
    • Abstract: A concerted effort has been underway in recent years to assess the causes and consequences of violent extremism. While some answers have emerged, many more questions remain open. At the individual level, theories have been proposed about what leads people to join militant groups and participate in violent activity. At the group level, scholars have studied the effectiveness of various militant groups, their recruitment strategies, and their organizational structure, hoping that these provide insight into their mode of fighting and likelihood of success. Perhaps most importantly, questions remain about the best ways to counter violent extremism.

    • Crime, Conflict and the Legitimacy Trade-off: University at Albany — Victor Asal, PhD, Chair of the Department of Public Administration and Professor in the Department of Political Science at Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy; and R. Karl Rethemeyer, PhD, Interim Dean Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy and Professor in the Public Administration and Policy Department
    • Abstract - Explaining Variation in Insurgents’ Participation in Crime: Insurgent organizations have become major players in criminal enterprises around the world. However, research examining why some participate in crime while others do not, remains underdeveloped. Examining newly collected annual data on 140 insurgent groups from 1998 to 2012, we will study the conditions driving insurgents’ participation in drug-crimes, extortion, smuggling, kidnapping for ransom, and robbery. We find that control of territory positively impacts involvement in all types of crime. However, we also find notable differences in the conditions driving participation in episodic crimes versus crimes that require institutional investments. Institutional crimes are, with the exception of smuggling, more likely to occur as insurgent groups age. Whereas efforts to cultivate legitimacy—as indicated by the ongoing provision of social services – substantially reduces the probability of involvement in episodic crimes. We discuss how this latter effect is reflective of a legitimacy tradeoff that emerges for groups pursuing both social support and material resources.

    • University at Albany – Matthew C. Ingraham, JD, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy
    • Abstract: My own work on violence in Latin America is in ways aimed at detecting latent phenomena like human trafficking. For instance, in a paper on the geo-spatial distribution of homicides across Brazil’s municipalities, a co-author and I found concentrated pockets of homicides in which victims were women. Since women are generally the victims of human trafficking, we proposed that one of the explanations/mechanism underlying this result could be the trafficking from women in these communities. We are also currently pursuing a related paper on femicide in the state of Sao Paulo. Additionally, I am pursuing similar research in Mexico. Each of these studies utilize spatial statistics which allow one to see how changes in one community affect the outcome of interest in nearby communities. One of my goals is to detect whether patterns affecting women in one place (e.g. female unemployment, kidnapping, disappearances, etc.) impact femicide rates in other places. Any positive correlation should be indicative of TIP.

  • 3:30-3:45 - Coffee
  • 3:45-4:50 - Session 4: Reflections on the Intersection between VE and TIP
  • Moderator: David E. Guinn, Project Director, SUNY Center for International Development
  • Panel: Laura Gonzalez-Murphy, Vy Lam, Patrick J. Hannon, Camilla Campisi, Rey Koslowski, Victor Asal, Karl Rathmeyer, Niloufer Siddiqui, Matthew Ingram
  • 4:50-5:00 – Closing Remarks: Gina Volynsky